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usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. Today’s staff member is Alan Walker, archivist in Research Services at the National Archives at College Park. His favorite record is this aerial photo from the records of aerial photography pioneer Albert W. Stevens (series 18-AWS, in Stills). So why does he like this photo?“Why do I like this? Well, it’s just awesome! Not only the flare effects, but look at the altitude. Stevens was waaaay up there. I’ve looked at a lot of photographs while working here, but this one has always mesmerized me.”Image: Flare Effects from the Sun. National Archives Identifier: 7419807.http://research.archives.gov/description/7419807.

usnatarchives:

October is American Archives Month. To celebrate, we are highlighting our staff around the country and their favorite records from the holdings in the National Archives. 

Today’s staff member is Alan Walker, archivist in Research Services at the National Archives at College Park. His favorite record is this aerial photo from the records of aerial photography pioneer Albert W. Stevens (series 18-AWS, in Stills). So why does he like this photo?

“Why do I like this? Well, it’s just awesome! Not only the flare effects, but look at the altitude. Stevens was waaaay up there. I’ve looked at a lot of photographs while working here, but this one has always mesmerized me.”

Image: Flare Effects from the Sun. National Archives Identifier: 7419807.http://research.archives.gov/description/7419807.

risingtensions:

Headshot d’un chat dans “La meilleure boulangerie de France” (M6) (by LeZ)

The mystery behind the A113 in Pixar movies.

reapergrellsutcliff:

Fashions of the Future as Imagined in 1893

Illustrations from “Future Dictates of Fashion” by W. Cade Gall that was published in the January 1893 issue of The Strand magazine.

rhamphotheca:

Protecting the Burmese Roof Turtle

Exciting field report from Myanmar where one of the world’s most critically endangered turtles is making a remarkable recovery!

Nesting season is in full swing for the Burmese roof turtle (Batagur trivittata). This species was feared extinct until it was “rediscovered” in 2002 when three individuals were found in a temple pond. Until then, scientists hadn’t seen the Burmese roof turtle since the 1930s.

Now, thanks to the collaborative field efforts of TSA and Wildlife Conservation Society there are 700 turtles thriving under the watchful eye of conservationists in the region. Due to a comprehensive program which includes nest protection, head-starting young turtles for future release and breeding in protected settings, this delicate species has been brought back from the brink.

And this season is turning out to be a bumper crop for nesting. To date, as many as 150 eggs from eight clutches have been recorded! A huge thanks to SOS - Save Our Species for their continued support of our work with this incredible species. Stay tuned for more reports from the field!

(via: Turtle Survival Alliance)

vintagetoyarchive:

 REVELL: 1959 Dr. Seuss Zoo TINGO Noodle Topped Stroodle Model Kit

vintagetoyarchive:

REVELL: 1959 Dr. Seuss Zoo TINGO Noodle Topped Stroodle Model Kit